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Stills from “Willow”. On Divine Fire and the Altar.

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Stills from Willow. © 1988 Lucasfilm Ltd.

To understand the role of electricity might have played in ancient rituals, please read these two amazing books by Hugh Crosthwaite:

  • [PDF] H. Crosthwaite, A Fire Not Blown, Metron Publications, 1997.
    [Bibtex]
    @Book{crosthwaite-firenotblown,
      Title                    = {A Fire Not Blown},
      Author                   = {Hugh Crosthwaite},
      Publisher                = {Metron Publications},
      Year                     = {1997},
    
      Abstract                 = {Investigations of Sacral Electrical Roots in Ancient Languages of the Mediterranean Region. With an Introduction by Alfred de Grazia.},
      File                     = {crosthwaite-firenotblown.pdf:crosthwaite-firenotblown.pdf:PDF},
      Owner                    = {trismegisto},
      Timestamp                = {2016.01.22},
      Url                      = {http://www.grazian-archive.com/quantavolution/QuantaHTML/_start_here.htm}
    }
  • [PDF] H. Crosthwaite, Ka, Metron Publications, 1996.
    [Bibtex]
    @Book{crosthwaite-ka,
      Title                    = {Ka},
      Author                   = {Hugh Crosthwaite},
      Publisher                = {Metron Publications},
      Year                     = {1996},
    
      Abstract                 = {A Handbook of Mythology, Sacred Practices, Electrical Phenomena, and their Linguistic Connections in the Ancient Mediterranean World. Introduction by Alfred de Grazia.},
      File                     = {crosthwaite-ka.pdf:crosthwaite-ka.pdf:PDF},
      Owner                    = {trismegisto},
      Timestamp                = {2016.01.22},
      Url                      = {http://www.grazian-archive.com/quantavolution/QuantaHTML/_start_here.htm}
    }

It’s a linguistic investigation on the role that electricity (that is, divine fire, different than the usual combustion fire) played in ancient times, as it connected gods and men. And also how the attributes of kings and their regalia are what they are. Does etymology support the idea that ancient man witnessed and was profoundly influenced by extreme electrical phenomena? According to Crosthwaite, there can be little doubt about it.

I’ll just quote a few paragraphs of Alfred de Grazia‘s introduction to the book:

The vocabulary invested with the phenomenon of fire is demonstrably capable of distinguishing electrical from other fires, within individual languages and with trans-linguistic similarities.

The object of priestly study was theological electricity. Lightning, magnetism and piezoelectric effects were related in the ancient mind as divine fire.

Although Crete was a land of many peoples and dialects, it followed a consistent pattern of ritual settings, and these were akin to the Egyptians. Significantly, high places were known to attract electrical discharges, but on lowlands and on hills wells could be dug and filled with stones that may have come from more electrified sacral ground and been expected to enhance local electrical effects. Language correlations include proper names, and here it is shown, inter alia, that two kings of Crete are named Minos, one of the Old Bronze Age and one of the Iron Age, and likewise there is an ingenious Daedalus in Minoan times and the same much later as pioneer sculptor of realistic marble statues in Greece.

Katreus was the important successor to the king-god Minos of Crete, and his name is made up of the two components, the aura of divinity and watching for something, here the essential electromagnetism. Nomen est omen is to be borne in mind at all times in etymology. A linguistic root may never just that, but is always something behavioral, real, connected with the direst and most blessed activities of homo schizo. Once more, astronomy, electricity, gods, and bulls find a score of linguistic links, and several identities and their associated myths become clearer.

grazian-archive.com

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