Jun 18, 2016
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Sāmarrā Bowl. Early swastika with tendril-like appendages.

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Bowl from Sāmarrā, Iraq, circa 5000 BCE. I assume this is a photo of a reconstruction. Photo credit unknown.

This neolithic town created a long line of splendid painted ceramics and female figurines (which start back in the pre-pottery era, so old is the tradition there). Here women stand in the quadrants, their hair whirling in the Four Winds, circled by a ring of scorpions. Scorpion Goddess is common in ancient Iraq and Iran as well as Egypt — Serqet, the companion of Auset (Isis) — and also known in Central America.

This is an early type of swastika. With tendril-like appendages. There is exhaustive documentation in this book:

  • [PDF] R. F. S. Starr, Indus Valley Painted Pottery, Princeton University Press., 1941.
    [Bibtex]
    @Book{indusvalleypaint031721mbp,
      author =      {Starr, Richard F. S.},
      title =       {Indus Valley Painted Pottery},
      year =        {1941},
      date =        {1941},
      editora =     {{Osmania University} and {Digital Library Of India}},
      publisher =   {Princeton University Press.},
      pagetotal =   {127},
      url =         {http://archive.org/details/indusvalleypaint031721mbp},
      urldate =     {2016-06-20},
      abstract =    {A guide to pottery created by one of the great forgotten civilisations, the Harappa people of the Indus valley. Many of the earliest books, particularly those dating back to the 1900s and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive. We are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork.},
      comment =     {ark:/13960/t7xk85x1n},
      editoratype = {collaborator},
      file =        {indusvalleypaint031721mbp.pdf:media/trismegisto/Vitamin/Documents/Bibliography/indusvalleypaint031721mbp.pdf:PDF},
      keywords =    {{NATURAL} {SCIENCES}},
      timestamp =   {2016-06-20}
    }

Let’s see more swastikas or, as I call them here, swirls:

Sourcememory.net

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Article Categories:
6000 - 5000 BCE · Mesopotamia · Tool / Weapon

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